Contributions of supra-level design to visual rhetoric in quilt books

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1997
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Oppedal Link, Denise
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English

The Department of English seeks to provide all university students with the skills of effective communication and critical thinking, as well as imparting knowledge of literature, creative writing, linguistics, speech and technical communication to students within and outside of the department.

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The Department of English and Speech was formed in 1939 from the merger of the Department of English and the Department of Public Speaking. In 1971 its name changed to the Department of English.

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1939-present

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  • Department of English and Speech (1939-1971)

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Visual rhetoric is "the ability of the writer to achieve the purpose of a document through visual communication" ("Visual Rhetoric" 77). The success of visual rhetoric depends upon the extent to which a document's visual elements consider audience, purpose, and context. For example, if a document intended for elderly readers uses 8-point type, audience has not been properly considered and the document's visual rhetoric fails at the intra-textuallevel. If a textbook uses only one degree of heading but attempts to present a hierarchy of information, purpose has not been considered and the document's visual rhetoric fails at the inter-textual level. If an annual report includes minute details in graphs intended to show general trends, purpose has not been considered and the document fails at the extra-textual level. If a field guide intended to be carried in a scientist's pocket is sixteen inches wide and twenty-four inches tall, context has not been considered and the document's visual rhetoric fails at the supra-textual level.

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Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1997