Sulfur fertilization response in Iowa corn and soybean production

dc.contributor.author Sawyer, John
dc.contributor.author Sawyer, John
dc.contributor.author Lang, Brian
dc.contributor.author Barker, Daniel
dc.contributor.author Barker, Daniel
dc.contributor.department Agronomy
dc.date 2018-02-18T08:53:25.000
dc.date.accessioned 2020-06-29T23:02:15Z
dc.date.available 2020-06-29T23:02:15Z
dc.date.copyright Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2012
dc.date.embargo 2017-04-11
dc.date.issued 2012-01-01
dc.description.abstract <p>Sulfur (S) is often classified as a “secondary” plant essential element, mainly due to a smaller plant requirement but also because it is less frequently applied as a fertilizer compared to other nutrients like the “macronutrients” nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K). This has certainly been the case in Iowa where research for many years had not documented S deficiency or fertilization need for optimal corn or soybean production. However, if deficient, S can have a dramatic effect on plant growth and crop productivity – more than the classification “secondary” would imply.</p> <p>In Iowa, before 2005 more than forty years of field research with corn and soybean conducted at many locations across the state had measured a yield response to S fertilizer application only three times out of approximately 200 trials – an indication of adequate available S supply and limited deficiency. This began to change in the early 2000’s as producers in northeast Iowa noticed yellow plant foliage and reduced growth in areas of alfalfa fields. After investigating several potential reasons for the growth problems, such as plant diseases, research in multiple fields documented improved alfalfa plant coloration, growth, and forage yield with S fertilizer application (Lang et al., 2006). These responses, as well as questions about deficiency symptoms in corn, led to investigation of potential response to S application in corn and soybean.</p>
dc.description.comments <p>This is a proceeding from <em>Wisconsin Crop Management Conference </em>51 (2012): 39. Posted with permission.</p>
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.identifier archive/lib.dr.iastate.edu/agron_conf/43/
dc.identifier.articleid 1052
dc.identifier.contextkey 10006767
dc.identifier.s3bucket isulib-bepress-aws-west
dc.identifier.submissionpath agron_conf/43
dc.identifier.uri https://dr.lib.iastate.edu/handle/20.500.12876/4383
dc.language.iso en
dc.source.bitstream archive/lib.dr.iastate.edu/agron_conf/43/2012_Sawyer_SulfurFertilization.pdf|||Sat Jan 15 00:15:07 UTC 2022
dc.subject.disciplines Agricultural Science
dc.subject.disciplines Agriculture
dc.subject.disciplines Agronomy and Crop Sciences
dc.subject.disciplines Research Methods in Life Sciences
dc.title Sulfur fertilization response in Iowa corn and soybean production
dc.type article
dc.type.genre conference
dspace.entity.type Publication
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