An infrastructure for the implementation of dynamic data warehouses

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2003-01-01
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Madineni, Vaishnavi
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Computer Science

Computer Science—the theory, representation, processing, communication and use of information—is fundamentally transforming every aspect of human endeavor. The Department of Computer Science at Iowa State University advances computational and information sciences through; 1. educational and research programs within and beyond the university; 2. active engagement to help define national and international research, and 3. educational agendas, and sustained commitment to graduating leaders for academia, industry and government.

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The Computer Science Department was officially established in 1969, with Robert Stewart serving as the founding Department Chair. Faculty were composed of joint appointments with Mathematics, Statistics, and Electrical Engineering. In 1969, the building which now houses the Computer Science department, then simply called the Computer Science building, was completed. Later it was named Atanasoff Hall. Throughout the 1980s to present, the department expanded and developed its teaching and research agendas to cover many areas of computing.

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1969-present

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Data Warehouses have become a critical part of many organizations knowledge management system. The typical implementation if a data warehouse is designed to support basic data types usually found in legacy and relational database systems. Data Warehousing has always been associated with a large storage capacity data source that assists management of an organization in making strategic decisions. The main misconceptions regarding data warehousing are that it is a task of enormous effort and that it is useful for only large organizations having huge amount of transaction data. In addition data warehouses are usually static. While these systems are extremely valuable there are applications where the static nature of these warehouses is a hindrance. To more completely support such applications a model of the dynamic data warehouse is presented. This warehouse is built, operated and then brought down using mobile agents.

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Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2003