Drought Tolerance in Soybean: Methods for Improvement

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2019-01-01
Authors
Thorp, Emily
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Dr. Walter Suza
Dr. Thomas Lubberstedt
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Agronomy

The Department of Agronomy seeks to teach the study of the farm-field, its crops, and its science and management. It originally consisted of three sub-departments to do this: Soils, Farm-Crops, and Agricultural Engineering (which became its own department in 1907). Today, the department teaches crop sciences and breeding, soil sciences, meteorology, agroecology, and biotechnology.

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The Department of Agronomy was formed in 1902. From 1917 to 1935 it was known as the Department of Farm Crops and Soils.

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1902–present

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  • Department of Farm Crops and Soils (1917–1935)

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Abstract

As opposed to the past, plant breeders today have access to far greater technology, and far greater obstacles to overcome. One of those challenges is the need for drought tolerance in crops such as soybeans. Soybeans are a major crop, affected by drought due to a lack of tolerance traits in cultivars grown today. Drought tolerant soybeans are important globally, because soybeans are grown in many countries around the world where yield losses from drought are frequent. Therefore, it is essential for farmers to make changes to their practices to help their crops tolerate or avoid drought, and breeding programs should dedicate more effort to develop drought tolerant cultivars. While U.S. plant breeders need to improve soybean cultivars through their own projects, it is also important to help establish programs in countries with the greatest need for drought tolerance traits and fewest resources.

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Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2019