Effects of Bird Activity, Ventilation Rate and Humidity on PM10 Concentration and Emission Rate of a Turkey Barn

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2008-08-01
Authors
Li, H.
Burns, Robert
Jacobson, Larry
Noll, Sally
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Harmon, Jay
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Xin, Hongwei
Distinguished Professor Emeritus
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Hoff, Steven
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Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

Since 1905, the Department of Agricultural Engineering, now the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering (ABE), has been a leader in providing engineering solutions to agricultural problems in the United States and the world. The department’s original mission was to mechanize agriculture. That mission has evolved to encompass a global view of the entire food production system–the wise management of natural resources in the production, processing, storage, handling, and use of food fiber and other biological products.

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In 1905 Agricultural Engineering was recognized as a subdivision of the Department of Agronomy, and in 1907 it was recognized as a unique department. It was renamed the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering in 1990. The department merged with the Department of Industrial Education and Technology in 2004.

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1905–present

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  • Department of Agricultural Engineering (1907–1990)

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Abstract

Concentrations and emissions of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters = 10 µm (PM10) were continuously measured in a mechanically ventilated turkey grow-out barn in central Iowa. The PM concentrations were measured with Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance (TEOM) units; and ventilation rate (VR) of the barn was measured by monitoring the runtime of calibrated ventilation fans. Bird activity (BA) was monitored with passive infrared detectors (PIDs). This paper describes the effects of BA, VR and indoor relative humidity (RH) on the PM concentration and emission rate (ER) based on 18 days of full 24-hr dynamic data collected during 67 days of flock-growing period (bird age of 40 - 107 d) in wintertime. Considerable diurnal variations were observed in BA, PM concentration and PM ER of the turkey barn. The PM concentration and ER were positively related to BA but negatively related to indoor RH. VR was negatively related to PM concentration but positively related to ER. The PM10 ER during the monitoring period varied from 2.71 to 25.6 mg/hr·bird or 13.4 to 28.8 g/d·AU (AU = 500 kg body mass).

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This proceeding is from Livestock Environment VIII, 31 August–4 September 2008, Iguassu Falls, Brazil. Paper No. 701P0408.

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Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2008