Impacts of Compost Application on Highway Construction Sites in Iowa

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2001-07-01
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Persyn, Russell
Richard, Tom
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Glanville, Thomas
Professor Emeritus
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Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

Since 1905, the Department of Agricultural Engineering, now the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering (ABE), has been a leader in providing engineering solutions to agricultural problems in the United States and the world. The department’s original mission was to mechanize agriculture. That mission has evolved to encompass a global view of the entire food production system–the wise management of natural resources in the production, processing, storage, handling, and use of food fiber and other biological products.

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In 1905 Agricultural Engineering was recognized as a subdivision of the Department of Agronomy, and in 1907 it was recognized as a unique department. It was renamed the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering in 1990. The department merged with the Department of Industrial Education and Technology in 2004.

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1905–present

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  • Department of Agricultural Engineering (1907–1990)

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Abstract

Runoff, interrill erosion, and growth of erosion control vegetation and weeds were measured on conventionally treated portions (control) of newly constructed roadway embankments, and on areas pretreated with topsoil or one of three different types of composted organics. Runoff rates and interrill erosion rates from the control and topsoil-treated plots were highest. Runoff rates from the three compost media (biosolids, yard waste, bio-industrial waste) used were statistically lower than the control. Runoff from plots treated with yard waste and bio-industrial waste composts were statistically lower from plots treated with topsoil. Interrill erosion rates from topsoil-treated plots were significantly higher than from compost-treated or control plots. The amounts of planted cover crop grown on all treatments were statistically indistinguishable. Mean values for weed growth on the control and topsoil plots are statistically indistinguishable, and all compost treatments except biosolids-10 cm and yard waste-5 cm produced significantly lower weed growth than either the topsoil or control plots.

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This is an ASAE Meeting Presentation, Paper No. 012076.

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Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2001