Plant-process model corn yield forecasts for Iowa

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1988
Authors
Krog, David
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Stanley R. Johnson
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Economics

The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 to teach economic theory as a truth of industrial life, and was very much concerned with applying economics to business and industry, particularly agriculture. Between 1910 and 1967 it showed the growing influence of other social studies, such as sociology, history, and political science. Today it encompasses the majors of Agricultural Business (preparing for agricultural finance and management), Business Economics, and Economics (for advanced studies in business or economics or for careers in financing, management, insurance, etc).

History
The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 under the Division of Industrial Science (later College of Liberal Arts and Sciences); it became co-directed by the Division of Agriculture in 1919. In 1910 it became the Department of Economics and Political Science. In 1913 it became the Department of Applied Economics and Social Science; in 1924 it became the Department of Economics, History, and Sociology; in 1931 it became the Department of Economics and Sociology. In 1967 it became the Department of Economics, and in 2007 it became co-directed by the Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Business.

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1898–present

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  • Department of Economic Science (1898–1910)
  • Department of Economics and Political Science (1910-1913)
  • Department of Applied Economics and Social Science (1913–1924)
  • Department of Economics, History and Sociology (1924–1931)
  • Department of Economics and Sociology (1931–1967)

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Abstract

The objective was to develop a plant-process corn yield forecasting model and examine how effective these forecasts might be in improving corn yield forecasts made at the state and crop reporting district level in Iowa. This study was conducted in light of recent budget cuts by the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) and elimination of the reporting of district corn yield forecasts in Iowa;Results indicated that district and state plant-process model (PPM) corn yield forecasts perform well compared to NASS forecasts in August and September but not very well in October and November. Also, the PPM forecasts did not perform well in the southern districts of Iowa. The PPM does not appear to be a comparable substitute for past NASS district corn yield forecasts;Combining PPM and NASS forecasts gives composite yield forecasts that are superior to both PPM and NASS forecasts, especially for the August forecast. At this stage in development, therefore, the usefulness of PPM forecasts would come from supplementing NASS sample yield information.

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Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1988