Effects of Angiotensin II Receptor Blockade on Overload-Induced Muscle Growth and Function In Mice

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2020-05
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Echevarria, Kenneth
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Kinesiology
The Department of Kinesiology seeks to provide an ample knowledge of physical activity and active living to students both within and outside of the program; by providing knowledge of the role of movement and physical activity throughout the lifespan, it seeks to improve the lives of all members of the community. Its options for students enrolled in the department include: Athletic Training; Community and Public Health; Exercise Sciences; Pre-Health Professions; and Physical Education Teacher Licensure. The Department of Physical Education was founded in 1974 from the merger of the Department of Physical Education for Men and the Department of Physical Education for Women. In 1981 its name changed to the Department of Physical Education and Leisure Studies. In 1993 its name changed to the Department of Health and Human Performance. In 2007 its name changed to the Department of Kinesiology. Dates of Existence: 1974-present. Historical Names: Department of Physical Education (1974-1981), Department of Physical Education and Leisure Studies (1981-1993), Department of Health and Human Performance (1993-2007). Related Units: College of Human Sciences (parent college), College of Education (parent college, 1974 - 2005), Department of Physical Education for Women (predecessor) Department of Physical Education for Men
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Angiotensin-II (ANG-II) has been associated with muscle atrophy and reduced growth factors, while ANG-II Receptor Blockers (ARBs) may hinder atrophy and restore insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling. However, ARB’s effect on muscle growth is unclear. PURPOSE: It was hypothesized that ARB treatment would positively impact skeletal muscle growth, evidenced by increased hypertrophy and growth-factor levels, compared to placebo. METHODS: Mice underwent plantaris FO or sham surgery. Then, mice received candesartan (6 mg/kg/day) or placebo (n=8-9/group) for 14 days. Plantaris IGF-1 and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) were measured by ELISA. Data were analyzed with 2-way ANOVAs. RESULTS: FO increased plantaris mass in both groups; however, ARB attenuated hypertrophy compared to placebo (Placebo: 13±0.5 vs. 26±2 mg and ARB: 13±0.6 vs. 20±1 mg, sham and FO, respectively, p<0.05). Plantaris IGF-1 increased with FO, with significantly greater response in ARB than placebo (Placebo: 51±7 vs. 109±12 pg/mg protein and ARB: 36±3 vs. 148±17 pg/mg protein, sham and FO, respectively, p<0.05). Plantaris FGF only increased with FO in ARB-group (Placebo: 788±88 vs. 901±88 pg/mg protein and ARB: 649±31 vs. 1075±104 pg/mg protein, sham and FO, respectively, p<0.05). CONCLUSION: ARB attenuated hypertrophic response to FO despite greater IGF-1 and FGF responses, compared to placebo.
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