Genetic similarity among pheromone and voltinism races of Ostrinia nubilalis (Hubner) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae)

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1999
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Marcon, P.C.R.G.
Taylor, D.
Mason, C.
Siegfried, B.
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Hellmich, Richard
Emeritus USDA-ARS Research Entomologist Emeritus Affiliate Professor
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Entomology

The Department of Entomology seeks to teach the study of insects, their life-cycles, and the practicalities in dealing with them, for use in the fields of business, industry, education, and public health. The study of entomology can be applied towards evolution and ecological sciences, and insects’ relationships with other organisms & humans, or towards an agricultural or horticultural focus, focusing more on pest-control and management.

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The Department of Entomology was founded in 1975 as a result of the division of the Department of Zoology and Entomology.

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The genetic variability of seven European corn borer populations, Ostrinia nubilalis, from North America and Europe was assessed by polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis and DNA sequencing. The nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1) region (≈ 500 base pair [bp]) and four mitochondrial (mtDNA) regions (1550 bp total) were examined. The smartweed borer, Ostrinia obumbratalis, and south-Western corn borer, Diatraea grandiosella, were used for comparisons. Of 106 restriction sites identified (80 in mtDNA and 26 in ITS-1), none differentiated geographical populations, pheromone races, or voltine ecotypes of the European corn borer. The lack of variation in the ITS-1 of European corn borer was confirmed by DNA sequence analysis. The genetic similarity of European corn borer populations, despite their wide geographical range and physiological differences, may be explained by a relatively recent origin for the voltinism and pheromone races, gene flow among races, and/or expansion from genetic bottlenecks.

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This article is from Insect Molecular Biology; 8 (1999);213-221; doi:10.1046/j.1365-2583.1999.820213.x .

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Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1999
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