A History of Respiratory Syncytial Viral Vaccine Development… What is next?

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Date
2018-01-01
Authors
Salpor, Jessica
Major Professor
Dr. David Verhoeven
Dr. Richard Martin
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Biomedical Sciences

The Department of Biomedical Sciences aims to provide knowledge of anatomy and physiology in order to understand the mechanisms and treatment of animal diseases. Additionally, it seeks to teach the understanding of drug-action for rational drug-therapy, as well as toxicology, pharmacodynamics, and clinical drug administration.

History
The Department of Biomedical Sciences was formed in 1999 as a merger of the Department of Veterinary Anatomy and the Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology.

Dates of Existence
1999–present

Related Units

  • College of Veterinary Medicine (parent college)
  • Department of Veterinary Anatomy (predecessor, 1997)
  • Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology (predecessor, 1997)

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Abstract

Although the disease burden of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is significant, no human vaccine exists. Historical clinical trial complications in the 1960s and the lack of understanding concerning RSV viral correlates of protection (CoP) and viable in vitro and in vivo models have delayed RSV vaccine development. The World Health Organization (WHO), PATH, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Network have been dedicated to RSV research efforts. The new vaccine and monoclonal antibody (mAb) candidates, built upon emerging knowledge, show potential for human vaccine viability by 2025 according to the WHO’s Product Development for Vaccines Advisory Committee (Mazur et al., 2018; Shi et al., 2017). This review will focus on challenging aspects of RSV vaccine development and aim to explore current vaccine approaches in clinical development to discuss which show potential for human vaccine viability.

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Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2018