Reticulate evolution helps explain apparent homoplasy in floral biology and pollination in baobabs (Adansonia; Bombacoideae; Malvaceae)

dc.contributor.author Karimi, Nisa
dc.contributor.author Grover, Corrinne
dc.contributor.author Wendel, Jonathan
dc.contributor.author Gallagher, Joseph
dc.contributor.author Wendel, Jonathan
dc.contributor.author Ané, Cécile
dc.contributor.author Baum, David
dc.contributor.department Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology
dc.date 2019-11-12T17:34:12.000
dc.date.accessioned 2020-06-30T02:18:31Z
dc.date.available 2020-06-30T02:18:31Z
dc.date.copyright Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2019
dc.date.embargo 2020-11-06
dc.date.issued 2019-11-06
dc.description.abstract <p>Baobabs (<em>Adansonia)</em> are a cohesive group of tropical trees with a disjunct distribution in Australia, Madagascar, and continental Africa, and diverse flowers associated with two pollination modes. We used custom targeted sequence capture in conjunction with new and existing phylogenetic comparative methods to explore the evolution of floral traits and pollination systems while allowing for reticulate evolution. Our analyses suggest that relationships in <em>Adansonia</em> are confounded by reticulation, with network inference methods supporting at least one reticulation event. The best supported hypothesis involves introgression between <em>A. rubrostipa</em> and core Longitubae, both of which are hawkmoth pollinated with yellow/red flowers, but there is also some support for introgression between the African lineage and Malagasy Brevitubae, which are both mammal-pollinated with white flowers. New comparative methods for phylogenetic networks were developed that allow maximum-likelihood inference of ancestral states and were applied to study the apparent homoplasy in floral biology and pollination mode seen in <em>Adansonia</em>. This analysis supports a role for introgressive hybridization in morphological evolution even in a clade with highly divergent and geographically widespread species. Our new comparative methods for discrete traits on species networks are implemented in the software PhyloNetworks.</p>
dc.description.comments <p>This is a manuscript of an article published as Karimi, Nisa, Corrinne E. Grover, Joseph P. Gallagher, Jonathan F. Wendel, Cécile Ané, and David A. Baum. "Reticulate evolution helps explain apparent homoplasy in floral biology and pollination in baobabs (Adansonia; Bombacoideae; Malvaceae)." <em>Systematic biology</em> (2019). doi: <a href="https://doi.org/10.1093/sysbio/syz073">10.1093/sysbio/syz073</a>. Posted with permission.</p>
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dc.identifier archive/lib.dr.iastate.edu/eeob_ag_pubs/378/
dc.identifier.articleid 1384
dc.identifier.contextkey 15756830
dc.identifier.s3bucket isulib-bepress-aws-west
dc.identifier.submissionpath eeob_ag_pubs/378
dc.identifier.uri https://dr.lib.iastate.edu/handle/20.500.12876/23262
dc.language.iso en
dc.source.bitstream archive/lib.dr.iastate.edu/eeob_ag_pubs/378/2019_Wendel_ReticulateEvolutionManuscript.pdf|||Fri Jan 14 23:51:18 UTC 2022
dc.source.uri 10.1093/sysbio/syz073
dc.subject.disciplines Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
dc.subject.keywords Comparative methods
dc.subject.keywords Hyb-Seq
dc.subject.keywords introgression
dc.subject.keywords network inference
dc.subject.keywords population trees
dc.subject.keywords reticulate evolution
dc.subject.keywords species tree inference
dc.subject.keywords targeted sequence capture
dc.title Reticulate evolution helps explain apparent homoplasy in floral biology and pollination in baobabs (Adansonia; Bombacoideae; Malvaceae)
dc.type article
dc.type.genre article
dspace.entity.type Publication
relation.isAuthorOfPublication 6d2c458f-b99a-4af5-8869-8b7b2e304592
relation.isOrgUnitOfPublication 6fa4d3a0-d4c9-4940-945f-9e5923aed691
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