Patterns of adolescent alcohol use: a study of the Reconnecting Youth In Iowa prevention program

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2004-01-01
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Parker, Stacey
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Human Development and Family Studies

The Department of Human Development and Family Studies focuses on the interactions among individuals, families, and their resources and environments throughout their lifespans. It consists of three majors: Child, Adult, and Family Services (preparing students to work for agencies serving children, youth, adults, and families); Family Finance, Housing, and Policy (preparing students for work as financial counselors, insurance agents, loan-officers, lobbyists, policy experts, etc); and Early Childhood Education (preparing students to teach and work with young children and their families).

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The Department of Human Development and Family Studies was formed in 1991 from the merger of the Department of Family Environment and the Department of Child Development.

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1991-present

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  • College of Human Sciences (parent college)
  • Department of Child Development (predecessor)
  • Department of Family Environment (predecessor)

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Using an experimental and control group, this research measured the impact of the Reconnecting Youth in Iowa (RYII) prevention program on patterns of alcohol use among adolescents. Adolescents completed the Reconnecting Youth High School Questionnaire (HSQ) and the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) survey three times to assess students' patterns of alcohol use. Adolescents' gender, race/ethnicity, age, family SES comparison, positive parenting, peer deviancy, and friend influence were studied to help understand how they influenced alcohol use patterns. Treatment positively impacted peer influence to not use alcohol/drugs while peer deviancy and negative parental influence were correlated with more use. This study will help RYIII prevention personnel better understand factors influencing adolescent alcohol use and make appropriate curriculum changes in RYIII prevention programming.

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Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2004