Rural Health Disparities: Connecting Research and Practice

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2020-10-01
Authors
Routh, Brianna
Burney, Janie
Greder, Kimberly
Katras, Mary Jo
Johnson, Kristen
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Greder, Kimberly
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Human Development and Family Studies

The Department of Human Development and Family Studies focuses on the interactions among individuals, families, and their resources and environments throughout their lifespans. It consists of three majors: Child, Adult, and Family Services (preparing students to work for agencies serving children, youth, adults, and families); Family Finance, Housing, and Policy (preparing students for work as financial counselors, insurance agents, loan-officers, lobbyists, policy experts, etc); and Early Childhood Education (preparing students to teach and work with young children and their families).

History


The Department of Human Development and Family Studies was formed in 1991 from the merger of the Department of Family Environment and the Department of Child Development.

Dates of Existence
1991-present

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  • College of Human Sciences (parent college)
  • Department of Child Development (predecessor)
  • Department of Family Environment (predecessor)

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Human Development and Family Studies
Abstract

Health disparities are prevalent in rural communities across the United States due to compositional factors (socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity, health behaviors) and contextual factors (access to resources). We identify health behaviors and outcome implications for rural families across the multistate USDA Hatch Act–funded projects Rural Family Speak/Rural Families Speak about Health (RFS/RFSH). Project findings cover the cyclical nature of depressive symptoms, factors influencing household nutrition and physical activity behaviors, importance of social supports, and use of health information. We also identify principles for action within the Extension land-grant mission including (1) delivery through mobile formats, (2) incorporating multiple family members, and (3) building on Policy, Systems, and Environment (PSE) approaches both within Extension program areas and across systems levels in the community. Rural health efforts need further adaptation and implementation across diverse communities. Extension can achieve this though professional development and evaluation efforts.

Comments

This accepted article is published as Brianna Routh, Janie Burney, Kimberly Greder, Mary Jo Katras, Kristen Johnson, Rural Health Disparities: Connecting Research and Practice, The Forum Journal, Fall 2020, 23(1); Posted with permission.

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Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2020
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