Corn Planter Attachment Effects on Soil and Residue

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1996-11-20
Authors
Hanna, Mark
Erbach, Don
Kaspar, Tom
Iqbal, Muhammed
Marley, Stephen
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Proceedings of the Integrated Crop Management Conference
Iowa State University Conferences and Symposia

The Iowa State University Integrated Crop Management Conference is Iowa's premier crop production education event. No other program in Iowa brings together the diverse range of topics, slate of expert presenters and results of the latest University research.

The ICM Conference offers workshops focusing on the latest in crop production technology. Experts from Iowa and surrounding states will provide research updates and results in soil fertility, soil and water management, crop production and pest management.

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Abstract

In recent years, an increasing amount of Iowa row crops have been planted into soil left undisturbed from the prior year's harvest. In 1994, one of five Iowa row crop acres was planted in a no-till system (NRCS, 1994). 'Various planter modifications and attachments are marketed to assist planting into undisturbed soil. The attachments are sometimes used also after full-width tillage such as a field cultivation or disking. Planter operators use the attachments to improve planting by moving residue or uneven soil clods from the row area or to assist seed placement in wetter than ideal soil conditions. Row cleaners and strip tillage devices impact the amount of residue cover left over the row after planting. Coulters that till soil in the seed zone affect soil around the seed. Decisions on the use and management of com planter attachments can be made by considering their effect on residue cover over the row area and soil conditions in the seed placement zone within the row.

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