Partial Biofiltration of Exhaust Air from a Hybrid Ventilated Deep-Pit Swine Finisher Barn

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2009-01-01
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Chen, Lide
Janni, Kevin
Schmidt, David
Nicolai, Richard
Jacobson, Larry
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Harmon, Jay
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Hoff, Steven
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Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

Since 1905, the Department of Agricultural Engineering, now the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering (ABE), has been a leader in providing engineering solutions to agricultural problems in the United States and the world. The department’s original mission was to mechanize agriculture. That mission has evolved to encompass a global view of the entire food production system–the wise management of natural resources in the production, processing, storage, handling, and use of food fiber and other biological products.

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In 1905 Agricultural Engineering was recognized as a subdivision of the Department of Agronomy, and in 1907 it was recognized as a unique department. It was renamed the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering in 1990. The department merged with the Department of Industrial Education and Technology in 2004.

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1905–present

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  • Department of Agricultural Engineering (1907–1990)

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Abstract

A strategy for providing partial biofiltration of a critical minimum amount of ventilation air (CMVR) from a hybrid ventilated swine finishing facility was developed and tested. The CMVR, defined as the minimum treated exhaust air that suppressed nighttime curtain opening movement, was set at 81 m3 h-1 pig-1 with the intention of providing enough fan ventilation to suppress inlet curtain movement during stable atmospheres, providing biofiltering for a high percentage of exhaust air. Two side-by-side 300-head hybrid ventilated deep-pit swine finishing rooms were used for this research, one room as the control (CTL) with the other treatment (TRT). The TRT room was fitted with a wood-chip based biofilter for scrubbing the CMVR. In terms of total room emissions, the TRT room had an average odor emission 37% less than the CTL room. Ammonia emission was 58% lower for the TRT room as compared to the CTL room. The results presented indicate that a strategy of partial biofiltration can result in significant reductions in odor and ammonia emissions when applied to hybrid ventilated swine finishing barns.

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This article is from Applied Engineering in Agriculture 25, no. 2 (2009): 269–280.

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Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2009
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