Evolution of soybean weed management in the United States

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2018-01-01
Authors
Rowe, Aaron
Major Professor
Allan J. Ciha
Mark Westgate
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Agronomy

The Department of Agronomy seeks to teach the study of the farm-field, its crops, and its science and management. It originally consisted of three sub-departments to do this: Soils, Farm-Crops, and Agricultural Engineering (which became its own department in 1907). Today, the department teaches crop sciences and breeding, soil sciences, meteorology, agroecology, and biotechnology.

History
The Department of Agronomy was formed in 1902. From 1917 to 1935 it was known as the Department of Farm Crops and Soils.

Dates of Existence
1902–present

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  • Department of Farm Crops and Soils (1917–1935)

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Abstract

Weeds have been an unwanted nuisance since the beginning of agriculture. The processes and technologies utilized to manage this yield limiting problem have evolved over time. Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] production in the United States has experienced all of the major agriculture revolutions. This has included horse-drawn field implements, tractor power implementation, chemical era, and the most recent era of biotechnology. There has been a continuous gain in efficiencies with the discovery and introduction of new technologies to manage weeds in soybeans. A period of rapid discovery and introduction of new and novel herbicide sites of action (SOA) with improved efficacy on target weed populations was experienced. Some of the SOA utilized proved to be more prone to weed populations with herbicide-resistance. Introduction of new herbicide active ingredients, a few new SOA, and herbicide-tolerant crops has been the answer to herbicide-tolerant weed species issues as they have arisen in the past. Herbicide-tolerant weed species are on the rise and new SOA are at a standstill. Biotechnology has offered herbicide-tolerant crops to the industry allowing old chemistries to be utilized in new ways which has aided in the fight against weeds. Land managers must diversify weed management techniques encompassing all cultural, mechanical, and herbicidal methods of weed removal available to preserve the tools and technologies and manage weeds that are increasingly difficult to manage.

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Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2018