Vertical Loading of Temperature Cables

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Date
1991
Authors
Curtis, R.
Thompson, Sidney
Ross, I.
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Schwab, Charles
Professor Emeritus
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Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

Since 1905, the Department of Agricultural Engineering, now the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering (ABE), has been a leader in providing engineering solutions to agricultural problems in the United States and the world. The department’s original mission was to mechanize agriculture. That mission has evolved to encompass a global view of the entire food production system–the wise management of natural resources in the production, processing, storage, handling, and use of food fiber and other biological products.

History
In 1905 Agricultural Engineering was recognized as a subdivision of the Department of Agronomy, and in 1907 it was recognized as a unique department. It was renamed the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering in 1990. The department merged with the Department of Industrial Education and Technology in 2004.

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1905–present

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  • Department of Agricultural Engineering (1907–1990)

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Abstract

One of the most popular methods of determining potential locations of spoilage in stored grains is through constant monitoring of the internal temperatures of the grain mass. Distinctive increases of the local temperatures in the grain are a good indication of potential spoilage problems. Daily inspection of the internal temperature of the stored grain can detect the presence of a "hot spot" before any grain is seriously deteriorated. The operator can then choose to aerate the grain to cool the "hot spot" or remove the grain from the bin. Daily monitoring of temperatures requires that sensing elements be placed within the grain mass. A common method of monitoring temperatures in a mass of stored grain utilizes thermocouples attached at regular intervals to high-strength steel cables. The entire assembly including the thermocouples and the cables is coated with a protective jacket. Temperature-sensing cables are available in many types, differing in surface material, size and cross-sectional shape. These cables are typically suspended from a grain bin roof in a standard pattern so they form a three-dimensional matrix of temperature monitoring points.

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This article is from Transactions of the ASAE 34, no. 1 (1991): 269–274.

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Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1991
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