Health uncertainty and food consumption in low-income households in Lima, Peru

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1995
Authors
Gingrich, Chris
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Paul W. Gallagher
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Economics

The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 to teach economic theory as a truth of industrial life, and was very much concerned with applying economics to business and industry, particularly agriculture. Between 1910 and 1967 it showed the growing influence of other social studies, such as sociology, history, and political science. Today it encompasses the majors of Agricultural Business (preparing for agricultural finance and management), Business Economics, and Economics (for advanced studies in business or economics or for careers in financing, management, insurance, etc).

History
The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 under the Division of Industrial Science (later College of Liberal Arts and Sciences); it became co-directed by the Division of Agriculture in 1919. In 1910 it became the Department of Economics and Political Science. In 1913 it became the Department of Applied Economics and Social Science; in 1924 it became the Department of Economics, History, and Sociology; in 1931 it became the Department of Economics and Sociology. In 1967 it became the Department of Economics, and in 2007 it became co-directed by the Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Business.

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1898–present

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  • Department of Economic Science (1898–1910)
  • Department of Economics and Political Science (1910-1913)
  • Department of Applied Economics and Social Science (1913–1924)
  • Department of Economics, History and Sociology (1924–1931)
  • Department of Economics and Sociology (1931–1967)

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Abstract

This study investigates the relationships between health uncertainty and food consumption among low-income households in developing countries. The particular sample households are from Lima, Peru's bottom expenditure quartile. Several food and nonfood inputs are important factors affecting health status and health variance. In addition, there is strong evidence that expected health status and health risk affect the consumption of several food commodities;The model also provides a means of analyzing the effects of policy alternatives on food consumption, expected health status, and health risk. The results show that education programs and price subsidies for tubers and dairy products are the most efficient means of increasing food consumption and improving health among poor households in Lima. In addition, education programs and tuber subsidies dramatically lower health risk suggesting that policymakers give these two programs high priority.

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Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1995