“Adapting Lindqvist’s Kinetic Garment Method for an Upcycled, Zero-Waste Childrenswear Romper”

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2018-01-01
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Stanley, April
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McKinney, Ellen
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International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA) Annual Conference Proceedings
Iowa State University Conferences and Symposia

The first national meeting of textile and clothing professors took place in Madison, Wisconsin in June 1959. With a mission to advance excellence in education, scholarship and innovation, and their global applications, the International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA) is a professional and educational association of scholars, educators, and students in the textile, apparel, and merchandising disciplines in higher education.

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A current upcycling trend is creating little girls' garments from menswear, exemplifying some tenets of sustainability. The purpose was to research methods for creating a sustainable little girls’ garment by upcycling menswear, which revealed a gap in the market for bifurcated, zero-waste designs. This design focused on specific elements of sustainability to increase useful lifespan: zero-waste and garment adjustability. Lindqvist’s (2013) experimental patternmaking technique, kinetic garment construction, was chosen for experimentation in conjunction with upcycled textiles to test adaptability for creating upcycled, zero-waste garments. Adapting Lindqvist’s (2013) method of kinetic garment construction by using the original technique along with ribbon casings resulted in a successful, upcycled, zero-waste romper. Implementing adjustability permits longer wear time and accommodates multi-sizes, approximately 3T – 5X. The coordinating headband constructed of men’s ties reinforced the concept of zero-waste upcycling. Implications regarding sustainability and experimental patternmaking exist for childrenswear apparel design courses and the children’s clothing market.

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