A full Bayesian assessment of the effect of highway bypasses on crashes, crash rates and citizens' safety in Iowa communities

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2007-01-01
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Cena, Lorenzo
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Nir Keren
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Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

Since 1905, the Department of Agricultural Engineering, now the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering (ABE), has been a leader in providing engineering solutions to agricultural problems in the United States and the world. The department’s original mission was to mechanize agriculture. That mission has evolved to encompass a global view of the entire food production system–the wise management of natural resources in the production, processing, storage, handling, and use of food fiber and other biological products.

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In 1905 Agricultural Engineering was recognized as a subdivision of the Department of Agronomy, and in 1907 it was recognized as a unique department. It was renamed the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering in 1990. The department merged with the Department of Industrial Education and Technology in 2004.

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1905–present

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  • Department of Agricultural Engineering (1907–1990)

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The construction of highway bypasses raises economic and safety concerns among citizens of bypassed communities. This thesis describes the use of a full Bayesian analysis to evaluate the impact of bypasses on traffic safety. Traffic safety has been assessed for the periods before and after the construction of the bypass both on the old road network consisting of the main road through town and on the new road network consisting of the main road and the bypass. Furthermore traffic safety has been assessed for all travelers through or around the communities and then for local citizens of the communities only.;The results suggest that overall crash frequencies and rates decrease, however, the rate of crashes involving citizens of the bypassed communities increases on the main road. The reduction in traffic volume may be affecting the rates of crashes involving local citizens.

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Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2007