Generalized instrumental inequalities: testing the instrumental variable independence assumption

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2020-02-29
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Mourifié, Ismael
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Kedagni, Desire
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Economics

The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 to teach economic theory as a truth of industrial life, and was very much concerned with applying economics to business and industry, particularly agriculture. Between 1910 and 1967 it showed the growing influence of other social studies, such as sociology, history, and political science. Today it encompasses the majors of Agricultural Business (preparing for agricultural finance and management), Business Economics, and Economics (for advanced studies in business or economics or for careers in financing, management, insurance, etc).

History
The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 under the Division of Industrial Science (later College of Liberal Arts and Sciences); it became co-directed by the Division of Agriculture in 1919. In 1910 it became the Department of Economics and Political Science. In 1913 it became the Department of Applied Economics and Social Science; in 1924 it became the Department of Economics, History, and Sociology; in 1931 it became the Department of Economics and Sociology. In 1967 it became the Department of Economics, and in 2007 it became co-directed by the Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Business.

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1898–present

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  • Department of Economic Science (1898–1910)
  • Department of Economics and Political Science (1910-1913)
  • Department of Applied Economics and Social Science (1913–1924)
  • Department of Economics, History and Sociology (1924–1931)
  • Department of Economics and Sociology (1931–1967)

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Abstract

This paper proposes a new set of testable implications of the instrumen- tal variable (IV) independence assumption: generalized instrumental inequalities. In our leading case with a binary outcome, we show that the generalized instrumen- tal inequalities are necessary and sufficient to detect all observable violations of the IV independence assumption. To test the generalized instrumental inequalities, we propose an approach combining a sample splitting procedure and intersection bounds inferential methods. This idea allows one to easily implement the test using the Stata package of Chernozhukov, Kim, Lee, and Rosen (2015).We apply our pro- posed strategy to assess the validity of the IV independence assumption for various instruments used in the returns to college literature.

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This is a manuscript of an article published as Kédagni, Désiré, and Ismael Mourifié. "Generalized instrumental inequalities: testing the instrumental variable independence assumption." Biometrika (2020). doi: 10.1093/biomet/asaa003. Posted with permission.

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Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2020
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