Effects of including Sweet Bran or modified distillers grains in the diet of feedlot steers and sorting at terminal implant on growth performance, feeding behavior, and liver abscess occurrence

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2022-08-21
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Heiderscheit, Katie J.
Beenken, Aubree M.
Deters, Erin L.
Hochmuth, Katherine G.
Jackson, Trey D.
Messersmith, Elizabeth M.
VanDerWal, Allison J.
VanValin, Katherine R.
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Oxford University Press
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Peschel, Joshua
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Hansen, Stephanie
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Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

Since 1905, the Department of Agricultural Engineering, now the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering (ABE), has been a leader in providing engineering solutions to agricultural problems in the United States and the world. The department’s original mission was to mechanize agriculture. That mission has evolved to encompass a global view of the entire food production system–the wise management of natural resources in the production, processing, storage, handling, and use of food fiber and other biological products.

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In 1905 Agricultural Engineering was recognized as a subdivision of the Department of Agronomy, and in 1907 it was recognized as a unique department. It was renamed the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering in 1990. The department merged with the Department of Industrial Education and Technology in 2004.

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1905–present

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  • Department of Agricultural Engineering (1907–1990)

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Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering

The Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering seeks to apply knowledge of the laws, forces, and materials of nature to the construction, planning, design, and maintenance of public and private facilities. The Civil Engineering option focuses on transportation systems, bridges, roads, water systems and dams, pollution control, etc. The Construction Engineering option focuses on construction project engineering, design, management, etc.

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The Department of Civil Engineering was founded in 1889. In 1987 it changed its name to the Department of Civil and Construction Engineering. In 2003 it changed its name to the Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering.

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1889-present

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  • Department of Civil Engineering (1889-1987)
  • Department of Civil and Construction Engineering (1987-2003)
  • Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering (2003–present)

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Electrical and Computer Engineering

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECpE) contains two focuses. The focus on Electrical Engineering teaches students in the fields of control systems, electromagnetics and non-destructive evaluation, microelectronics, electric power & energy systems, and the like. The Computer Engineering focus teaches in the fields of software systems, embedded systems, networking, information security, computer architecture, etc.

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The Department of Electrical Engineering was formed in 1909 from the division of the Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering. In 1985 its name changed to Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering. In 1995 it became the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

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1909-present

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  • Department of Electrical Engineering (1909-1985)
  • Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering (1985-1995)

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Animal Science

The Department of Animal Science originally concerned itself with teaching the selection, breeding, feeding and care of livestock. Today it continues this study of the symbiotic relationship between animals and humans, with practical focuses on agribusiness, science, and animal management.

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The Department of Animal Husbandry was established in 1898. The name of the department was changed to the Department of Animal Science in 1962. The Department of Poultry Science was merged into the department in 1971.

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Abstract
The objectives were to assess the effects of dietary Sweet Bran (Cargill Corn Milling, Blair, NE) on performance and feeding behavior of feedlot steers and determine if terminal implant pen sorting affects performance, feeding behavior, and liver abscess (LA) rate. Two hundred sixteen Angus-cross steers (253 ± 18 kg) were stratified by body weight (BW) to 36 pens. From d 0 to 60, diets contained 40% Sweet Bran (SWBR) or 25% modified distiller’s grains and 15% dry rolled corn (MOD; n = 18 pens/treatment). On d 60, steers began transition within treatments to finishing diets containing 25% Sweet Bran or 25% modified distiller’s grains (MDGS). On d 111, half of the pens for each dietary treatment were re-stratified by BW to pens (SORT) while the other half were returned to original pens (NOSORT; n = 9 pens/treatment). Steer BW and pen dry matter intake (DMI) were recorded monthly. Rate of feed disappearance was determined on d 5/6, 53/54, 104/105, and 117/118. Pen was the experimental unit for all analyses. The model included the fixed effect of diet for all pre-sort analyses; post-sort analyses included the fixed effects of diet, sort, and the interaction and the random effects of pen and the interaction of diet and pen. On d 60, SWBR had greater BW than MOD (P = 0.05), and SWBR had a greater average daily gain (ADG) from d 0 to 60 (P = 0.05). Though there were no differences after d 28, SWBR had greater DMI d 0 to 28 (P = 0.05). From d 60 to 88, SWBR tended to have lesser ADG than MOD (P = 0.09). Post-sort (d 111 to 196), SWBR tended to have lesser ADG than MOD (P = 0.06), and SORT had a greater rate of feed disappearance than NOSORT (d 117/118; P = 0.01); there were no differences on other dates (Diet: P ≥ 0.38). For final BW, there was a tendency for MOD to be greater than SWBR, and SORT tended to be greater than NOSORT (Diet: P = 0.06; Sort: P = 0.10). Pre- and post-sort ruminal pH had no treatment by day differences (P ≥ 0.77). LA incidence averaged 25%, though rate was not affected by diet, sorting, or the interaction (P ≥ 0.16). Overall, there were no dietary differences in feed disappearance rates, though SORT steers had greater rate of feed disappearance than NOSORT steers on d 117/118. Nominal differences in feeding behavior were noted and including Sweet Bran in the diet was beneficial in the growing period as cattle adjusted to the feedlot.
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This is the version of record for the article Heiderscheit, Katie J., Aubree M. Beenken, Erin L. Deters, Katherine G. Hochmuth, Trey D. Jackson, Elizabeth M. Messersmith, Allison J. VanDerWal, Katherine R. VanValin, Joshua M. Peschel, and Stephanie L. Hansen. "Effects of including Sweet Bran or modified distillers grains in the diet of feedlot steers and sorting at terminal implant on growth performance, feeding behavior, and liver abscess occurrence." Translational Animal Science 6, no. 4 (2022): txac112. Available online at DOI: 10.1093/tas/txac112. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License (https://creativecommons.org/ licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Copyright 2022 The Author(s). Posted with permission.
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