The community context of family resources and adolescent delinquency

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2003-01-01
Authors
Nyaronga, Dan
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Human Development and Family Studies

The Department of Human Development and Family Studies focuses on the interactions among individuals, families, and their resources and environments throughout their lifespans. It consists of three majors: Child, Adult, and Family Services (preparing students to work for agencies serving children, youth, adults, and families); Family Finance, Housing, and Policy (preparing students for work as financial counselors, insurance agents, loan-officers, lobbyists, policy experts, etc); and Early Childhood Education (preparing students to teach and work with young children and their families).

History


The Department of Human Development and Family Studies was formed in 1991 from the merger of the Department of Family Environment and the Department of Child Development.

Dates of Existence
1991-present

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  • College of Human Sciences (parent college)
  • Department of Child Development (predecessor)
  • Department of Family Environment (predecessor)

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Abstract

The study predicted that community adversity (ethnic diversity), controlling for community poverty, and family adversity (family poverty and single parenthood) would influence adolescent delinquency additively and multiplicatively through family social resources and through individual/control factors. An effective analysis of community influence on individual outcomes requires a multilevel analysis that includes community level, family level, and individual level variables. This quantitative research used data samples from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, Wave 1 (1995), and the 1999 U.S. Census. The findings demonstrate that there is (a) a unique influence of ethnic diversity on adolescent delinquency, independent of community poverty and family adversity; (b) an indirect influence of ethnic diversity on adolescent delinquency through family social resources; (c) a moderation of detrimental influence of minority status under highly diverse community environments and dissipation of the beneficial influences of family social resources under highly diverse community environments.

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Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2003