Self-perceived youth leadership and life skills development among Iowa FFA members

Date
1995
Authors
Wingenbach, Gary
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Abstract

The objectives of this study were to: (1) describe Iowa FFA members by their self-perceived youth leadership life skills development, participation in FFA leadership activities, participation in nonFFA leadership activities, achievement expectancy, years in the FFA, age, gender, self-reported grade point average, and place of residence, (2) assess the level of youth leadership life skills development possessed by Iowa FFA members, (3) determine if a relationship exists between self-perceived leadership life skills development and participation in FFA leadership activities, nonFFA leadership activities, achievement expectancy, years in the FFA, age, gender, self-reported grade point average, and place of residence, and (4) compare the results of this study with those obtained in the study by Dormody and Seevers (1994) in Arizona, Colorado and New Mexico;The dependent variable was youth leadership life skills development. The independent variables were participation in FFA leadership activities, participation in nonFFA leadership activities, achievement expectancy, years in the FFA, age, gender, self-reported grade point average, and place of residence. The instrument used was the Iowa FFA Youth Leadership Life Skills Development Questionnaire. Life skills were defined as skills in communications, decision making, getting along with others, learning, management, understanding self, and working with groups. Cronbach's Alpha was 0.93 for the instrument;Data collection was from February 17 to March 31, 1995. Mailed questionnaires were sent to a total of 400 Iowa FFA members who were randomly selected from a population of 10,186. The aggregate response rate was 70% (N = 316);Forced entry multiple regression procedures were employed to determine if relationships between the dependent and independent variables were statistically significant at the.05 level. A total of 22.26% of the variance in youth leadership life skills development scores was explained by a combination of participation in FFA leadership activities, after school jobs, years in the FFA, grade point average, and gender;When comparing youth leadership life skills development grand mean scores, no statistical difference existed between this study and the study conducted by Dormody and Seevers (1994).

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Agricultural education and studies, Agricultural education (Agricultural extension education), Agricultural extension education
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