Spanish Household Demand for Seafood Products

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Date
1998
Authors
Manrique, Justo
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Jensen, Helen
Professor Emeritus
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Economics

The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 to teach economic theory as a truth of industrial life, and was very much concerned with applying economics to business and industry, particularly agriculture. Between 1910 and 1967 it showed the growing influence of other social studies, such as sociology, history, and political science. Today it encompasses the majors of Agricultural Business (preparing for agricultural finance and management), Business Economics, and Economics (for advanced studies in business or economics or for careers in financing, management, insurance, etc).

History
The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 under the Division of Industrial Science (later College of Liberal Arts and Sciences); it became co-directed by the Division of Agriculture in 1919. In 1910 it became the Department of Economics and Political Science. In 1913 it became the Department of Applied Economics and Social Science; in 1924 it became the Department of Economics, History, and Sociology; in 1931 it became the Department of Economics and Sociology. In 1967 it became the Department of Economics, and in 2007 it became co-directed by the Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Business.

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1898–present

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  • Department of Economic Science (1898–1910)
  • Department of Economics and Political Science (1910-1913)
  • Department of Applied Economics and Social Science (1913–1924)
  • Department of Economics, History and Sociology (1924–1931)
  • Department of Economics and Sociology (1931–1967)

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Abstract

Current changes underway in Spain are likely to lead to changes in demand for different types of seafood products. Double-hurdle models were used to model Spanish household expenditures on these goods, explicitly accounting for the value of women’s time in the case of processed seafood goods. The empirical evidence shows that the set of statistically significant factors in the participation and expenditure equations is not the same for fresh and processed seafood goods. The value of women’s time (for expenditures on frozen, cured and canned seafood goods), income, and household demographic variables are important determinants of both participation and expenditures on seafood products.

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This paper is prepared for presentation at the annual meetings of the American Agricultural Economics Association, Salt Lake City, UT, August 2-5, 1998.

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Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1998