Experimental Study on Hidden Corrosion/Delamination Detection with Ultrasonic Guided Waves

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1999
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Zhu, Wenhao
Rose, Joseph
Agarwala, Vinod
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Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation
Center for Nondestructive Evaluation

Begun in 1973, the Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation (QNDE) is the premier international NDE meeting designed to provide an interface between research and early engineering through the presentation of current ideas and results focused on facilitating a rapid transfer to engineering development.

This site provides free, public access to papers presented at the annual QNDE conference between 1983 and 1999, and abstracts for papers presented at the conference since 2001.

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Hidden corrosion detection is critical in the aerospace industry. Occurring on the inside surfaces or at the interfaces of an aircraft’s skin, the corrosion must be detected from the outside surface. Surface waves are, therefore, not suitable for detecting such defects/failures. Ultrasonic bulk wave methods can be used to detect the corrosion caused thinning in the wall or a delamination of a structure [1,2]. However, since the method is based on point-by-point testing, it becomes a tedious time consuming procedure for large area inspection. Guided wave methods are being developed to tackle this problem [3–6]. An experimental study of hidden corrosion/delamination detection in single/multiple layer aluminum plates is conducted with specially selected ultrasonic guided wave modes. Both corrosion simulation specimens by machine cutting, and real corrosion specimens by electrochemical processing, Two-layer specimens have been prepared with such corroded sheets to form an artificial interface corrosion/delamination. Various wave modes are subsequently generated on these specimens to examine the implications of thinning on mode cutoff, group velocity changes, mode frequency shifts, and transmission and reflection amplitudes. Finally, a practical problem of skin to honeycomb core delamination detection with guided waves is also addressed.

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Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1999