Global impacts of fertilization and herbivore removal on soil net nitrogen mineralization are modulated by local climate and soil properties

dc.contributor.author Risch, Anita
dc.contributor.author Biederman, Lori
dc.contributor.author Fay, Philip
dc.contributor.author Biederman, Lori
dc.contributor.department Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology
dc.date 2020-10-05T13:54:19.000
dc.date.accessioned 2021-02-25T18:42:28Z
dc.date.available 2021-02-25T18:42:28Z
dc.date.issued 2020-01-01
dc.description.abstract <p>Soil nitrogen (N) availability is critical for grassland functioning. However, human activities have increased the supply of biologically limiting nutrients, and changed the density and identity of mammalian herbivores. These anthropogenic changes may alter net soil N mineralization (soil net Nmin), that is, the net balance between N mineralization and immobilization, which could severely impact grassland structure and functioning. Yet, to date, little is known about how fertilization and herbivore removal individually, or jointly, affect soil net Nmin across a wide range of grasslands that vary in soil and climatic properties. Here we collected data from 22 grasslands on five continents, all part of a globally replicated experiment, to assess how fertilization and herbivore removal affected potential (laboratory‐based) and realized (field‐based) soil net Nmin. Herbivore removal in the absence of fertilization did not alter potential and realized soil net Nmin. However, fertilization alone and in combination with herbivore removal consistently increased potential soil net Nmin. Realized soil net Nmin, in contrast, significantly decreased in fertilized plots where herbivores were removed. Treatment effects on potential and realized soil net Nmin were contingent on site‐specific soil and climatic properties. Fertilization effects on potential soil net Nmin were larger at sites with higher mean annual precipitation (MAP) and temperature of the wettest quarter (T.q.wet). Reciprocally, realized soil net Nmin declined most strongly with fertilization and herbivore removal at sites with lower MAP and higher T.q.wet. In summary, our findings show that anthropogenic nutrient enrichment, herbivore exclusion and alterations in future climatic conditions can negatively impact soil net Nmin across global grasslands under realistic field conditions. This is an important context‐dependent knowledge for grassland management worldwide.</p>
dc.description.comments <p>This article is published as Risch, Anita C., Stefan Zimmermann, Barbara Moser, Martin Schütz, Frank Hagedorn, Jennifer Firn, Philip A. Fay et al. "Global impacts of fertilization and herbivore removal on soil net nitrogen mineralization are modulated by local climate and soil properties." <em>Global Change Biology</em> (2020). doi: <a href="https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.15308">10.1111/gcb.15308</a>.</p>
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.identifier archive/lib.dr.iastate.edu/eeob_ag_pubs/437/
dc.identifier.articleid 1443
dc.identifier.contextkey 19667740
dc.identifier.s3bucket isulib-bepress-aws-west
dc.identifier.submissionpath eeob_ag_pubs/437
dc.identifier.uri https://dr.lib.iastate.edu/handle/20.500.12876/94191
dc.language.iso en
dc.source.bitstream archive/lib.dr.iastate.edu/eeob_ag_pubs/437/2020_Biederman_GlobalImpacts.pdf|||Sat Jan 15 00:16:32 UTC 2022
dc.source.uri 10.1111/gcb.15308
dc.subject.disciplines Climate
dc.subject.disciplines Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
dc.subject.disciplines Nature and Society Relations
dc.subject.disciplines Soil Science
dc.subject.keywords anthropogenic change
dc.subject.keywords global grasslands
dc.subject.keywords grazers
dc.subject.keywords nitrogen
dc.subject.keywords NutNet
dc.subject.keywords phosphorus
dc.subject.keywords potassium
dc.subject.keywords potential and realized soil net nitrogen mineralization
dc.subject.keywords precipitation
dc.subject.keywords temperature
dc.title Global impacts of fertilization and herbivore removal on soil net nitrogen mineralization are modulated by local climate and soil properties
dc.type article
dc.type.genre article
dspace.entity.type Publication
relation.isAuthorOfPublication 8c742964-cca6-44c7-ba97-d6a9b5ec7a59
relation.isOrgUnitOfPublication 6fa4d3a0-d4c9-4940-945f-9e5923aed691
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