Selected measures of health in women fed conjugated linoleic acid-enriched products from organic, pasture-fed cattle

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2008-01-01
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Brown, Andrew
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Donald C. Beitz
Allen H. Trenkle
Mark S. Hargrove
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Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology

The Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Molecular Biology was founded to give students an understanding of life principles through the understanding of chemical and physical principles. Among these principles are frontiers of biotechnology such as metabolic networking, the structure of hormones and proteins, genomics, and the like.

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The Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics was founded in 1959, and was administered by the College of Sciences and Humanities (later, College of Liberal Arts & Sciences). In 1979 it became co-administered by the Department of Agriculture (later, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences). In 1998 its name changed to the Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Molecular Biology.

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1959–present

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  • Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics (1959–1998)

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Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) purportedly alters body composition, glucose tolerance, hepatic function, lipoprotein distributions, and other markers of health. However, results of research are often inconclusive or contradictory, and presently no studies have investigated the effects of incorporation of CLA from organic, pasture-fed cattle. To determine the effects of CLA in products from pasture-fed beef and dairy cattle, 18 young, healthy women consumed a diet comprised of beef and dairy products either from pasture-fed or grain-fed cattle. Endpoints of interest included insulin resistance, body composition, circulating lipids, and other selected disease risk factors. A diet naturally enriched with a 3.5 fold increase in CLA by incorporation of beef and dairy products from organic, pasture-fed cattle did not result in measurable improvements in selected measures of health in premenopausal women as compared with a similar diet with products from grain-fed cattle.

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ISBN: 9780549684893

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Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2008