MicroPulse™ transscleral cyclophotocoagulation in the treatment of canine glaucoma: Preliminary results (12 dogs)

Date
2018-08-15
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Sebbag, Lionel
Sebbag, Lionel
Allbaugh, Rachel
Allbaugh, Rachel
Strauss, Rachel
Strong, Travis
Wehrman, Rita
Foote, Braidee
Ben-Shlomo, Gil
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Veterinary Clinical Sciences
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Veterinary Clinical Sciences
Abstract

Objective: To describe the clinical application and effect of MicroPulse™ transscleral cyclophotocoagulation (MP‐TSCPC) in dogs with glaucoma.

Animals studied: Twelve dogs with primary (n = 8) or secondary (n = 4) glaucoma, aged 2‐13 years (mean ± SD, 7.2 ± 3.8 years).

Procedures: MP‐TSCPC was performed under sedation or general anesthesia. Laser duty cycle was 31.3%, laser power varied from 2000‐2800 mW, and each hemisphere was treated for 90‐180 seconds. The probe was applied to each quadrant in a “sweeping motion,” sparing the 3 and 9 o'clock positions.

Results: The number of MP‐TSCPC procedures per eye varied from 1 to 3 (1.4 ± 0.7). Intraocular pressure (IOP) was controlled (<25 mm Hg) in 11/12 dogs (92%) within 1‐15 days post‐operatively. The IOP control at 1 month and the duration between repeated procedures were significantly greater in eyes treated with high energy laser (2800 mW) compared to 2000‐2500 mW. Long‐term follow‐up (315.3 ± 100.7 days) showed controlled IOP in 5/12 (42%) and vision retention in 4/8 (50%) dogs. In unsuccessful cases, loss of IOP control or vision loss occurred within 3‐245 days (109.1 ± 93.7 days) and 28‐261 days (114 ± 101.6 days), respectively, resulting in a salvage procedure in 6 dogs. Complications were as follows: corneal hypoesthesia (92%), anterior uveitis (67%), post‐operative ocular hypertension (50%), neurotrophic corneal ulcer (25%), keratoconjunctivitis sicca (8%), and rubeosis iridis (8%).

Conclusions: MP‐TSCPC is a viable tool for managing canine glaucoma, although further studies are required to improve the long‐term effect and reduce the complication rate.

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This is the peer-reviewed version of the following article: Sebbag, Lionel, Rachel A. Allbaugh, Rachel A. Strauss, Travis D. Strong, Rita F. Wehrman, Braidee C. Foote, and Gil Ben‐Shlomo. "MicroPulse™ transscleral cyclophotocoagulation in the treatment of canine glaucoma: Preliminary results (12 dogs)." Veterinary Ophthalmology (2018), which has been published in final form at DOI: 10.1111/vop.12603. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving. Posted with permission.

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