Housework and Dance as Counterpoints in French-Tunisian Filmmaker Raja Amari's Satin rouge

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2010-01-01
Authors
Weber-Fève, Stacey
Weber-Fève, Stacey
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World Languages and Cultures
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World Languages and Cultures
Abstract

In the late 1950s and early 1960s, when an independent, postcolonial Tunisia emerged from under French colonial rule and began to engage in “modernized” nation-building practices, questions addressing the role of Tunisian women (and more importantly their image in this “new,” postcolonial and independent society) took precedence. Many political, artistic, and intellectual figures were concerned with how Tunisian women’s images were constructed in the public eye, in the arts, and in the media. These concerns led to a variety of reformist thoughts during this nationalist movement (and even still today), but all postulations appeared to coalesce in the perceived belief in the need to construct “modern” Tunisian women’s images into a single, unifying image of motherhood.

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This article is published as Weber-Feve, S.,Housework and Dance as Counterpoints in French-Tunisian Filmmaker Raja Amari’s “Satin rouge”’ in Quarterly Review of Film and Video (2010) 27.1, 1-13. Doi: 10.1080/10509200802165283. Posted with permission.

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