Economic and Environmental Analysis of Farm-Scale Biodigesters to Produce Energy for Kitchen Stove Use

dc.contributor.author Bartlett, Zachary
dc.contributor.author Olivares, Alexandra
dc.contributor.author Rosentrater, Kurt
dc.contributor.author Lu, Yang
dc.contributor.author Rosentrater, Kurt
dc.contributor.department Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering
dc.date 2018-02-14T12:02:53.000
dc.date.accessioned 2020-06-29T22:34:02Z
dc.date.available 2020-06-29T22:34:02Z
dc.date.copyright Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2014
dc.date.embargo 2014-09-04
dc.date.issued 2014-07-01
dc.description.abstract <p>Developing countries throughout the world currently fuel kitchen stoves for cooking by burning wood which is responsible for many health and environmental problems. Producing fuel for cooking via anaerobic digestion is a very ecofriendly and resourceful solution that is being explored. To determine the sustainability of anaerobic digestion throughout these regions, multiple biodigester designs were tested under conditions specific to various third-world countries; the countries tested were Nicaragua, Bolivia, Nigeria, India and Indonesia. Factors to be considered included the use of local biomass resources and building materials. Determining the fueling efficiency of anaerobic digestion in comparison to burning wood consisted of evaluating the production costs and environmental impacts. This was accomplished utilizing techno-economic analysis (TEA) and life cycle assessment (LCA). TEA results indicated that tube digesters are the most cost effective method of anaerobic digestion in all countries tested; tube digestion at a family scale ranged from approximately $0.24 per meal to $0.73 per meal. The LCA showed that operation of anaerobic digestion required much more water than previously considered which may cause it to not be a sustainable method. However, it did emit a much lower amount of carbon dioxide than burning wood. The CO<sub>2</sub> emissions per meal ranged from 0.97 kg per meal to 1.29 kg per meal. The water impacts ranged from 76 L/meal to 100 L/meal. Comparing the two fueling methods proved that anaerobic digestion was a more economically and environmentally effective process.</p>
dc.identifier archive/lib.dr.iastate.edu/abe_eng_conf/395/
dc.identifier.articleid 1394
dc.identifier.contextkey 6078332
dc.identifier.s3bucket isulib-bepress-aws-west
dc.identifier.submissionpath abe_eng_conf/395
dc.identifier.uri https://dr.lib.iastate.edu/handle/20.500.12876/422
dc.language.iso en
dc.source.bitstream archive/lib.dr.iastate.edu/abe_eng_conf/395/2014_Bartlett_EconomicEnvironmental.pdf|||Fri Jan 14 23:56:08 UTC 2022
dc.source.uri 10.13031/aim.20141904758
dc.subject.disciplines Agriculture
dc.subject.disciplines Bioresource and Agricultural Engineering
dc.subject.disciplines Oil, Gas, and Energy
dc.subject.keywords biogas
dc.subject.keywords bioreactors
dc.subject.keywords food
dc.subject.keywords economic analysis
dc.subject.keywords economic evaluation
dc.title Economic and Environmental Analysis of Farm-Scale Biodigesters to Produce Energy for Kitchen Stove Use
dc.type article
dc.type.genre conference
dspace.entity.type Publication
relation.isAuthorOfPublication ae6468d9-2286-48ad-9293-5cfa893ea5f3
relation.isOrgUnitOfPublication 8eb24241-0d92-4baf-ae75-08f716d30801
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