Application of Cross-Linked Carboxymethyl Cellulose Degradation by 1-Glucosidase and Vaginal Microbes to Toxic Shock Syndrome

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1985-09-01
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Sierks, Michael
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Chemical and Biological Engineering

The function of the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering has been to prepare students for the study and application of chemistry in industry. This focus has included preparation for employment in various industries as well as the development, design, and operation of equipment and processes within industry.Through the CBE Department, Iowa State University is nationally recognized for its initiatives in bioinformatics, biomaterials, bioproducts, metabolic/tissue engineering, multiphase computational fluid dynamics, advanced polymeric materials and nanostructured materials.

History
The Department of Chemical Engineering was founded in 1913 under the Department of Physics and Illuminating Engineering. From 1915 to 1931 it was jointly administered by the Divisions of Industrial Science and Engineering, and from 1931 onward it has been under the Division/College of Engineering. In 1928 it merged with Mining Engineering, and from 1973–1979 it merged with Nuclear Engineering. It became Chemical and Biological Engineering in 2005.

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1913 - present

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  • Department of Chemical Engineering (1913–1928)
  • Department of Chemical and Mining Engineering (1928–1957)
  • Department of Chemical Engineering (1957–1973, 1979–2005)
    • Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering (2005–present)

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Eleven bacterial and two yeast strains, four of which were previously identified as having activity on a lightly cross-linked carboxymethyl cellulose (CLD-2) found in one type of superabsorbent tampon, were grown on a variety of substrates, most containing cellulosics. None produced detectable amounts of cellulases, but all elaborated beta-glucosidase. None of these 13 strains nor 3 commercially obtained beta-glucosidase preparations could hydrolyze CLD-2, although a commercial cellulase and two other bacterial preparations known to produce cellulases could. Based on these results, it appears that previous work suggesting that the degradation of CLD-2 by vaginal microbes and beta-glucosidase is implicated in the production by Staphylococcus aureus of toxin causing toxic shock syndrome must be reevaluated.

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Published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 50, no. 3 (September 1985): 634–637.

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Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1985
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