Living in the Moment: The Effect of Mindfulness on Aggression and Well-Being

dc.contributor.author Faulhaber, Manuela
dc.contributor.author McKnight, Kelly
dc.contributor.author Frederick, Miranda
dc.contributor.author Amundson, Anja
dc.contributor.department Psychology
dc.date 2018-02-18T19:16:30.000
dc.date.accessioned 2020-07-07T05:11:31Z
dc.date.available 2020-07-07T05:11:31Z
dc.date.issued 2017-04-11
dc.description.abstract <p>Previous research suggests that mindfulness may be linked to lower levels of hostility and aggressive behavior (Brown & Ryan, 2003). In the following study, we investigated the relationships between mindfulness, aggression and well-being, such as exercise and musicality. Individuals with high levels of mindfulness tend to have a greater sense of well-being, and express less aggressive physical and verbal behaviors (Borders et al, 2009).</p> <p>In this study, a cross-sectional design was employed. The sample consisted of 307 college students (Mean age = 19.66, SD = 3.51), which completed the Mindfulness Attention Awareness Scale (Brown & Ryan, 2003), the Buss Perry Aggression Questionnaire (Buss & Perry, 1992), the Brief Self-Control Scale (Tangney et al, 2004), Rumination-Reflection Questionnaire (Trapnell & Campbell, 1999) and others, as well as a Demographic and Activity Questionnaire.</p> <p>We found that mindfulness is negatively correlated with hostility (r = -.413, p < .001). Also, verbal aggression is negatively correlated with kindness and compassion (r = -.247, p < .001). On the other hand, minutes of meditation per day are positively correlated with time spent exercising (r = .386, p < .001) and playing an instrument (r = .337, p < .001).</p> <p>Our results are consistent with other studies showing that mindfulness and meditation are an indicator to decrease hostility as well as verbal aggression (Heppner et al, 2008). Furthermore, these findings suggest that mindfulness may have other positive effects on well-being that should be further investigated.</p>
dc.identifier archive/lib.dr.iastate.edu/undergradresearch_symposium/2017/posters/21/
dc.identifier.articleid 1303
dc.identifier.contextkey 10574438
dc.identifier.s3bucket isulib-bepress-aws-west
dc.identifier.submissionpath undergradresearch_symposium/2017/posters/21
dc.identifier.uri https://dr.lib.iastate.edu/handle/20.500.12876/91757
dc.relation.ispartofseries Symposium on Undergraduate Research and Creative Expression
dc.source.bitstream archive/lib.dr.iastate.edu/undergradresearch_symposium/2017/posters/21/P.32_Faulhaber.pdf|||Fri Jan 14 22:32:59 UTC 2022
dc.subject.disciplines Psychology
dc.title Living in the Moment: The Effect of Mindfulness on Aggression and Well-Being
dc.type event
dc.type.genre event
dspace.entity.type Publication
relation.isOrgUnitOfPublication 796236b3-85a0-4cde-b154-31da9e94ed42
relation.isSeriesOfPublication 6730f354-97b8-4408-bad3-7e5c3b2fca9d
thesis.degree.discipline Faulhaber: Psychology and Sociology; McKnight: Psychology and Criminal Justice; Frederick: Psychology; Amundson: Biology
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