Calibration of a Model for Packing Whole Grains

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Date
1991
Authors
Thompson, Sidney
Schwab, Charles
Ross, I.
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Schwab, Charles
Professor Emeritus
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Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

Since 1905, the Department of Agricultural Engineering, now the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering (ABE), has been a leader in providing engineering solutions to agricultural problems in the United States and the world. The department’s original mission was to mechanize agriculture. That mission has evolved to encompass a global view of the entire food production system–the wise management of natural resources in the production, processing, storage, handling, and use of food fiber and other biological products.

History
In 1905 Agricultural Engineering was recognized as a subdivision of the Department of Agronomy, and in 1907 it was recognized as a unique department. It was renamed the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering in 1990. The department merged with the Department of Industrial Education and Technology in 2004.

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1905–present

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  • Department of Agricultural Engineering (1907–1990)

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Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering
Abstract

The computer program WPACKING was validated using bin data for three different bin conditions: 1) a smooth-walled bin filled with wheat, 2) a corrugated-walled bin filled with wheat, and 3) a corrugated-walled bin filled with corn. WPACKING is a computer program which utilizes the differential form of Janssen’s equation to predict the pressures and amount of material stored in a bin. The differential form of Janssen’s equation allows the material properties in the equation to vary as a function of different properties. The material properties suggested for use in the WPACKING program were based upon previous experimental work by various researchers. From using the WPACKING program, it was apparent that a change in grain height has a greater effect in increasing the amount of packing than does a change in bin diameter or moisture content of the stored material.

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This article is from Applied Engineering in Agriculture 7, no. 4 (1991): 450–456.

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Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1991
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