Resistant Starch: Promise for Improving Human Health

Date
2013-11-01
Authors
Hendrich, Suzanne
Schalinske, Kevin
Hollis, James
Birt, Diane
Boylston, Terri
Hendrich, Suzanne
Jane, Jay-Lin
Scott, Marvin
Hollis, James
Li, Li
McClelland, John
Moore, Samuel
Phillips, Gregory
Rowling, Matthew
Schalinske, Kevin
Scott, Marvin
Whitley, Elizabeth
Major Professor
Advisor
Committee Member
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Altmetrics
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Ames Laboratory
Organizational Unit
Mechanical Engineering
Organizational Unit
Veterinary Pathology
Organizational Unit
Agronomy
Organizational Unit
Journal Issue
Series
Department
Ames LaboratoryFood Science and Human NutritionMechanical EngineeringVeterinary PathologyAgronomyVeterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine
Abstract

Ongoing research to develop digestion-resistant starch for human health promotion integrates the disciplines of starch chemistry, agronomy, analytical chemistry, food science, nutrition, pathology, and microbiology. The objectives of this research include identifying components of starch structure that confer digestion resistance, developing novel plants and starches, and modifying foods to incorporate these starches. Furthermore, recent and ongoing studies address the impact of digestion-resistant starches on the prevention and control of chronic human diseases, including diabetes, colon cancer, and obesity. This review provides a transdisciplinary overview of this field, including a description of types of resistant starches; factors in plants that affect digestion resistance; methods for starch analysis; challenges in developing food products with resistant starches; mammalian intestinal and gut bacterial metabolism; potential effects on gut microbiota; and impacts and mechanisms for the prevention and control of colon cancer, diabetes, and obesity. Although this has been an active area of research and considerable progress has been made, many questions regarding how to best use digestion-resistant starches in human diets for disease prevention must be answered before the full potential of resistant starches can be realized.

Comments

This article is from Advances in Nutrition 4 (2013): 587, doi: 10.3945/an.113.004325

Description
Keywords
Citation
DOI
Collections