Book Review of Conservation by Proxy: Indicator, Umbrella, Keystone, Flagship, and Other Surrogate Species

Date
2014-12-01
Authors
Grant, Tyler
Grant, Tyler
Eyheralde, Peter
Telemeco, Melissa
Moorhouse, Amy
Klaver, Robert
Reeves, Rebecca
Grimlund, Karin
Podaril, Amy
Emeterio, Sarah
Klaver, Robert
Major Professor
Advisor
Committee Member
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Altmetrics
Authors
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Journal Issue
Series
Department
Natural Resource Ecology and ManagementEcology, Evolution and Organismal Biology
Abstract

In the tallgrass prairies of the United States, the regal fritillary (Speyeria idalia) often is considered a reliable indicator of high quality remnant habitat. Purple milkweed (Asclepias purpurascens) is considered an indicator of high quality oak savanna habitat at the edge of prairie. Indicator and other surrogate species often are regarded as inescapable necessities in conservation, because limited budgets and the myriad pieces of an ecosystem render comprehensive monitoring impossible. Regardless of whether or not surrogate species are necessary, do they really work?

Comments

This review is published as T. J. Grant, P. G. Eyheralde, M. S. C. Telemeco, A. L. Moorhouse, R. A. Reeves, K. Grimlund, A. Podaril, S. E. Emeterio, and R. W. Klaver. Book Review: Conservation by Proxy: Indicator, Umbrella, Keystone, Flagship, and Other Surrogate Species. Prairie Naturalist 46:109-110.

Description
Keywords
Citation
DOI
Source
Collections