Myers-Briggs® preferences and academic success in the first college semester

Date
2013-01-01
Authors
Sanborn, Debra
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Daniel C. Robinson
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Altmetrics
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Educational Leadership and Policy Studies
Abstract

This research examined aspects of Myers-Briggs® (MBTI®) preferences and academic success in the first college semester. Precollege characteristics of ACT and class rank, academic performance during the first semester of college, and MBTI preference were analyzed for their significance among students within a learning community at a Midwest research university, fall 2004 to fall 2011. Statistical analyses were completed to determine if there is a relationship between type preference and academic success. ENFP, the preference for Extraverted Intuition with Feeling and Perceiving, was the most frequent type preference for students in the sample. ENFP was found to negatively relate to first-semester grade point for the research population and two cohorts. Identifying a trend toward specific type preferences related to academic achievement may provide support for the student population and enhance retention interventions

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