Using a blend of the Knowledge Framework and the Project Framework to develop materials for teaching public speaking

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2020-01-01
Authors
Schmeisser, Tamara
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Tammy Slater
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English

The Department of English seeks to provide all university students with the skills of effective communication and critical thinking, as well as imparting knowledge of literature, creative writing, linguistics, speech and technical communication to students within and outside of the department.

History
The Department of English and Speech was formed in 1939 from the merger of the Department of English and the Department of Public Speaking. In 1971 its name changed to the Department of English.

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1939-present

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  • Department of English and Speech (1939-1971)

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Abstract

While the Japanese education system has placed an emphasis on having students understanding the language used in texts to prepare them for passing written university entrance exams, Japanese learners struggle with using language orally. As a result, Japanese learners are hesitant to speak English in both formal and informal contexts due to a strong fear of making a mistake, creating disruption in the classroom, and losing face. This has thus led to teachers encountering a Japanese “silence,” which then creates challenges and frustrations in the language learning classroom. Using several theories and frameworks that include content-based language learning (CBLL), project-based language learning (PBLL), and Mohan’s Knowledge Framework (1986), as well as Beckett and Slater’s Project Framework (2005) and Slater and Beckett’s revised Project Framework (2019), this project offers a unit plan designed to teach students public speaking skills that aim not only to hone their existing skills but also to develop language and their ability to use language orally.

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Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2020