Scattering investigation based on acoustical holography

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1993
Authors
Cheng, Ming-Te
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Anna Pate
J. Adin Mann, III
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Aerospace Engineering

The Department of Aerospace Engineering seeks to instruct the design, analysis, testing, and operation of vehicles which operate in air, water, or space, including studies of aerodynamics, structure mechanics, propulsion, and the like.

History
The Department of Aerospace Engineering was organized as the Department of Aeronautical Engineering in 1942. Its name was changed to the Department of Aerospace Engineering in 1961. In 1990, the department absorbed the Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics and became the Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. In 2003 the name was changed back to the Department of Aerospace Engineering.

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1942-present

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  • Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics (1990-2003)

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Abstract

The objective of this research is to investigate sound scattering by an object using a two-surface measurement technique that separates the incident field and the scattered field. The separation technique is developed in cartesian and cylindrical coordinates. The decomposition method in the cartesian coordinate system is based on the principle that any wave form can be decomposed into plane-wave components by using a two dimensional spatial Fourier transform. For the cylindrical coordinate system, a two plane separation technique is based on decomposing the sound field into cylindrical waves. Numerical simulations are performed and the effect of various parameters are investigated. Specifically, the distance between two measurement surfaces, the distance between measurement points, and the aperture size are investigated. In addition, experimental studies were conducted inside an anechoic chamber with a baffled loudspeaker as a source, illuminating four different scatterers. The decomposed scattered field is then used to estimate the far-field target strength. The experiments demonstrate the feasibility of the field separation technique.

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Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1993