Thermal effects on the magnetic properties of titanium modified cobalt ferrite

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2015-01-01
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Nlebedim, Ikenna
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Jiles, David
Distinguished Professor Emeritus
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Electrical and Computer Engineering

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECpE) contains two focuses. The focus on Electrical Engineering teaches students in the fields of control systems, electromagnetics and non-destructive evaluation, microelectronics, electric power & energy systems, and the like. The Computer Engineering focus teaches in the fields of software systems, embedded systems, networking, information security, computer architecture, etc.

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The Department of Electrical Engineering was formed in 1909 from the division of the Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering. In 1985 its name changed to Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering. In 1995 it became the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

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1909-present

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  • Department of Electrical Engineering (1909-1985)
  • Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering (1985-1995)

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The temperature dependence of the magnetic properties of titanium modified cobalt ferrite is presented. The change of maximum magnetization obtained at H ≈ 2.4 MA/m between any two temperatures increases systematically with composition, which is desirable for applications in devices. Variation in magnetocrystalline anisotropy and coercivity were different from previous studies on cation substituted cobalt ferrite. At lower concentrations, the effect of lower thermal energy dominated the effect of non-magnetic cation substitutions in controlling the anisotropy.The reverse was the case at higher concentrations. The temperature dependence of coercivity is dominated by the contribution of magnetocrystalline anisotropy to coercivity, while the compositional dependence of coercivity is dominated by microstructural contribution through the pinning of domain walls.

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The following article appeared in Journal of Applied Physics 117 (2015): 17A506 and may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4919229.

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Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2015
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