A taxonomy of the female private detective in contemporary literature

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1992
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Regenold, Michele
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English

The Department of English seeks to provide all university students with the skills of effective communication and critical thinking, as well as imparting knowledge of literature, creative writing, linguistics, speech and technical communication to students within and outside of the department.

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The Department of English and Speech was formed in 1939 from the merger of the Department of English and the Department of Public Speaking. In 1971 its name changed to the Department of English.

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1939-present

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  • Department of English and Speech (1939-1971)

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Abstract

The name Sherlock Holmes is nearly synonymous with the word detective for many people due to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's vastly popular ratiocinative detective stories. However, Edgar Allan Poe is considered the author of the first ratiocinative or classical detective story in the 1840s. Poe introduced and Doyle masterfully articulated the classical detective formula while writers such as Agatha Christie and Dorothy Sayers continued the classical tradition well into the twentieth century (Cawelti 80).

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Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1992