A Neglected Ricardian Aspect Of Labor Supply

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Date
1979
Authors
Adams, James
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Economics

The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 to teach economic theory as a truth of industrial life, and was very much concerned with applying economics to business and industry, particularly agriculture. Between 1910 and 1967 it showed the growing influence of other social studies, such as sociology, history, and political science. Today it encompasses the majors of Agricultural Business (preparing for agricultural finance and management), Business Economics, and Economics (for advanced studies in business or economics or for careers in financing, management, insurance, etc).

History
The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 under the Division of Industrial Science (later College of Liberal Arts and Sciences); it became co-directed by the Division of Agriculture in 1919. In 1910 it became the Department of Economics and Political Science. In 1913 it became the Department of Applied Economics and Social Science; in 1924 it became the Department of Economics, History, and Sociology; in 1931 it became the Department of Economics and Sociology. In 1967 it became the Department of Economics, and in 2007 it became co-directed by the Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Business.

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1898–present

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  • Department of Economic Science (1898–1910)
  • Department of Economics and Political Science (1910-1913)
  • Department of Applied Economics and Social Science (1913–1924)
  • Department of Economics, History and Sociology (1924–1931)
  • Department of Economics and Sociology (1931–1967)

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Abstract

In this paper we develop and estimate a model of the supply of personal services, which is applied to physicians. Typically the services are embodied in the consumers who demand them, in the sense that resale is costly. At least this is true of medical care, which according to a recent analysis (Grossman, 1972) is combined with personal contributions to health such as exercise time to create" additions to the patient's health. Our view of the supply of medical care emphasizes the choice between treating a smaller number of patients (more generally, dealing with a smaller number of clients) more intensively and a larger number less intensively, a choice which we term the Extensive-Intensive Allocative Question,

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