Master's and Doctoral Thesis Citations: Analysis and Trends of a Longitudinal Study

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2003-01-01
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Parsons, Kathy
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Reference and Instruction
Subject librarians in the Reference & Instruction Division select books, journals, and other information resources for the Library's collections; provide general and specialized reference services; and provide instruction in the use of libraries and information. The Associate Dean for Reference & Instruction administers Library 160, a required, undergraduate course that helps students identify, locate, and use information resources in a variety of formats
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This article reports the results of a longitudinal study of over 9100 citations from 629 master’s and doctoral theses written between 1973 and 1992 at a large mid-western landgrant university. The results of this study suggest that graduate students writing theses favor current research regardless of disciplinary affiliation. The length of theses increased over time and the number of citations in thesis bibliographies varied by discipline. Implications of the results for collection development and scholarship as well as areas for future research are discussed.

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This is a post-print of an article from portal: Libraries and the Academy, 3, no. 3 (2003): 259–276, doi:

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Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2003
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