The beginnings of agricultural education in Midwestern rural schools, 1895-1915

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2010-01-01
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Shoemaker, Audrey
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Pamela Riney-kehrberg
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History
The Department of History seeks to provide students with a knowledge of historical themes and events, an understanding of past cultures and social organizations, and also knowledge of how the past pertains to the present.

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The Department of History was formed in 1969 from the division of the Department of History, Government, and Philosophy.

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This thesis documents the beginnings of rural agricultural education as part of the Progressive Era of United States history. As urban growth spurred politicians, educators, and activists to ponder the possibility of a nation-wide, or even global, food crisis, reformers turned to the rural school system to educate a more knowledgeable and modern farming class. Rural resistance to this movement was widespread, as many rural residents saw in it a plan to force them and their children into becoming a permanent farming class. However, there were multiple communities across the Midwest in which early, formal agricultural education took root. In these communities, reformers involved the local community in the design and implementation of agricultural education that was specific to each community's needs. The movement to reform the American Midwestern countryside through its schools offers insight both into the Progressive movement, and into the inner workings of turn-of-the-century rural America.

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Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2010