The Effects of Housing Prices, Wages, and Commuting Time on Joint Residential and Job Location Choices

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1998
Authors
So, Kim
Otto, Daniel
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Economics

The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 to teach economic theory as a truth of industrial life, and was very much concerned with applying economics to business and industry, particularly agriculture. Between 1910 and 1967 it showed the growing influence of other social studies, such as sociology, history, and political science. Today it encompasses the majors of Agricultural Business (preparing for agricultural finance and management), Business Economics, and Economics (for advanced studies in business or economics or for careers in financing, management, insurance, etc).

History
The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 under the Division of Industrial Science (later College of Liberal Arts and Sciences); it became co-directed by the Division of Agriculture in 1919. In 1910 it became the Department of Economics and Political Science. In 1913 it became the Department of Applied Economics and Social Science; in 1924 it became the Department of Economics, History, and Sociology; in 1931 it became the Department of Economics and Sociology. In 1967 it became the Department of Economics, and in 2007 it became co-directed by the Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Business.

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1898–present

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  • Department of Economic Science (1898–1910)
  • Department of Economics and Political Science (1910-1913)
  • Department of Applied Economics and Social Science (1913–1924)
  • Department of Economics, History and Sociology (1924–1931)
  • Department of Economics and Sociology (1931–1967)

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Abstract

Rural areas facing declining populations and limited economic growth have attempted a variety of strategies to counter these trends. Traditional strategies include developing value- added agriculture and resource-based industries, recruiting new industrial firms, and tourism/retirement-based strategies. More recently, analysts and policymakers have reconsidered a regional system approach to developing rural places (Rusk 1995; Galston and Baehler 1995; Henry and Barkley 1997). The relatively stronger economic performance of urban centers suggests that nearby places may be able to benefit from outsourcing or networking with urban-based firms as well as allowing an expanded labor base to commute to jobs in urban places.

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This is a Paper prepared for presentation at the American Agricultural Economics Association Annual Meeting, Salt Lake City, Utah, August 2-5, 1998.

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Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1998