Tonsils of slaughtered pigs as marker sample for Salmonella positive pork

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1999
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Swanenburg, M.
Urlings, H.
Keuzenkamp, D.
Snijders, J.
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International Conference on the Epidemiology and Control of Biological, Chemical and Physical Hazards in Pigs and Pork
Iowa State University Conferences and Symposia

The SafePork conference series began in 1996 to bring together international researchers, industry, and government agencies to discuss current Salmonella research and identify research needs pertaining to both pig and pork production. In subsequent years topics of research presented at these conferences expanded to include other chemical and biological hazards to pig and pork production.

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Pork is responsible for approximately 15% of all cases of salmonellosis in humans in Western Europe and North America (I). To reduce the prevalence of pork-borne salmonellosis in man, it is important that carcasses of slaughtered pigs and other edible pork products do not contain salmonella after the slaughter process. As long as it is not possible to avoid contamination of pork with salmonella, the contamination level should be as low as reasonably achievable. In order to reach this situation, contaminated carcasses should be identified, so that this meat can be processed (e.g. heated) to eliminate the safety risks. For this reason it can be useful to investigate a sample, which can be collected easily and is able to predict if salmonella is present on the carcass after slaughter.

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Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1999