The effect of macropore morphology of actual anecic earthworm burrows on water infiltration: A COMSOL simulation

Thumbnail Image
File
2023-Horton-EffectMacroporeManuscript.pdf (3.76 MB)

File Embargoed Until: (2025-03-01)
Date
2023-03
Authors
Zhang, Jie
Wen, Na
Sun, Quan
Liu, Gang
Major Professor
Advisor
Committee Member
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
© 2023 Elsevier B.V.
Authors
Person
Horton, Robert
Distinguished Professor
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Organizational Unit
Agronomy

The Department of Agronomy seeks to teach the study of the farm-field, its crops, and its science and management. It originally consisted of three sub-departments to do this: Soils, Farm-Crops, and Agricultural Engineering (which became its own department in 1907). Today, the department teaches crop sciences and breeding, soil sciences, meteorology, agroecology, and biotechnology.

History
The Department of Agronomy was formed in 1902. From 1917 to 1935 it was known as the Department of Farm Crops and Soils.

Dates of Existence
1902–present

Historical Names

  • Department of Farm Crops and Soils (1917–1935)

Related Units

Journal Issue
Is Version Of
Versions
Series
Department
Abstract
Soil macropores impact water infiltration. Due to the complexity of macropore structure, most macropore soil water dynamic simulations use simplified assumptions, such as cylindrical shape macropores, which do not well represent fluid flow in actual macropores. In this study, 3D digitalized structures of actual anecic earthworm burrows are obtained by combining tin casting with a 3D scanner. The in-situ earthworm burrows are imported into finite element numerical simulation software (COMSOL). Based on simulations, the effects of burrow spatial characteristics, such as number (N), length (L), average diameter (Davg), and tortuosity (τ) of partially penetrating (non-through) and fully penetrating (through) burrows, on water infiltration are clarified. The N value of non-through burrows correlates significantly with preferential flow infiltration rates (r = 1). In addition to the N value, the L value of non-through burrows is an important factor affecting preferential flow infiltration (r = 0.99). For the through earthworm burrows, macroporosity (εp) is the best predictor of Ksat. Unlike Davg and L, the τ of burrows has a low correlation coefficient with Ksat. The increase of adjacent infiltration is N-dependent for non-through burrows and is N-independent for through burrows. These findings demonstrate that actual macropore morphology can be used for numerical simulations, which provides a new pathway forward for pore-scale soil water dynamic research.
Comments
This is a manuscript of an article published as Zhang, Jie, Na Wen, Quan Sun, Robert Horton, and Gang Liu. "The effect of macropore morphology of actual anecic earthworm burrows on water infiltration: A COMSOL simulation." Journal of Hydrology 618 (2023): 129261. doi:10.1016/j.jhydrol.2023.129261. Posted with permission.

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 License.
Description
Keywords
Citation
DOI
Subject Categories
Copyright
Collections