Flooded Soil Syndrome

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2011-09-01
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Mallarino, Antonio
Al-Kaisi, Mahdi
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Sawyer, John
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Fallow Syndrome is a condition where crops planted the year after an extended period with no plant growth exhibit reduced early growth and yield. On corn plants the syndrome exhibits classic phosphorus (P) deficiency symptoms, including slow-stunted early growth, purple coloration, and poorly developed roots. This effect is called Fallow Syndrome because it is observed in soils where, for moisture conservation, the land has been idled for a year and kept fallow with no crop or weed growth. This allows accumulation of moisture in the soil for the next cycle of crop production.

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