Modeling partial surface evaporative cooling of chickens

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2001-07-01
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Yanagi, Tadayuki
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Xin, Hongwei
Distinguished Professor Emeritus
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Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

Since 1905, the Department of Agricultural Engineering, now the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering (ABE), has been a leader in providing engineering solutions to agricultural problems in the United States and the world. The department’s original mission was to mechanize agriculture. That mission has evolved to encompass a global view of the entire food production system–the wise management of natural resources in the production, processing, storage, handling, and use of food fiber and other biological products.

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In 1905 Agricultural Engineering was recognized as a subdivision of the Department of Agronomy, and in 1907 it was recognized as a unique department. It was renamed the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering in 1990. The department merged with the Department of Industrial Education and Technology in 2004.

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1905–present

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  • Department of Agricultural Engineering (1907–1990)

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Abstract

A transient model was developed to predict heat and mass transfer between the environment and chickens subjected to partial surface evaporative cooling under various dry to humid, calm to drafty and hot conditions. A factorial experiment composed by 3 air dry-bulb temperatures (tdb) (35, 38 and 41 °C), 2 dew point temperatures (tdp) (21.1 and 26.7 °C) and 3 air velocities (V) (0.2, 0.7 and 1.2 m.s -1 ) was designed to evaluate the physiological responses of the birds subject to thermal stress with and with out use of direct evaporative cooling. Deep body temperature (tb) and surface temperature (tsurf) were measured throughout the tests via telemetry and thermography, respectively. The model predicts tb rise after 50 min of acute heat exposure (Dtb,50), and it can also be used to predict the effects of wetness level (b) and V on Dtb,50. The model provides a convenient, interactive tool for determining Dtb,50 on wetted and non-wetted hens as a function of environmental conditions.

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This is an ASAE Meeting Presentation, Paper No. 013011

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Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2001