Proliferative enteropathy: a global enteric disease of pigs caused by Lawsonia intracellularis

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2005-12-01
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Kroll, Jeremy
Roof, Michael
Hoffman, Lorraine
Harris, D.L.
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Dickson, James
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Animal Science

The Department of Animal Science originally concerned itself with teaching the selection, breeding, feeding and care of livestock. Today it continues this study of the symbiotic relationship between animals and humans, with practical focuses on agribusiness, science, and animal management.

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The Department of Animal Husbandry was established in 1898. The name of the department was changed to the Department of Animal Science in 1962. The Department of Poultry Science was merged into the department in 1971.

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Proliferative enteropathy (PE; ileitis) is a common intestinal disease affecting susceptible pigs raised under various management systems around the world. Major developments in the understanding of PE and its causative agent, Lawsonia intracellularis, have occurred that have led to advances in the detection of this disease and methods to control and prevent it. Diagnostic tools that have improved overall detection and early onset of PE in pigs include various serological and molecular-based assays. Histological tests such as immunohistochemistry continue to be the gold standard in confirming Lawsonia-specific lesions in pigs post mortem. Despite extreme difficulties in isolating L. intracellularis, innovations in the cultivation and the development of pure culture challenge models, have opened doors to better characterization of the pathogenesis of PE through in vivo and in vitro L. intracellularis–host interactions. Advancements in molecular research such as the genetic sequencing of the entire Lawsonia genome have provided ways to identify various immunogens, metabolic pathways and methods for understanding the epidemiology of this organism. The determinations of immunological responsiveness in pigs to virulent and attenuated isolates of L. intracellularis and identification of various immunogens have led to progress in vaccine development.

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This article is from Animal Health Research Reviews 6 (2005): 173, doi:10.1079/AHR2005109. Posted with permission.

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Sat Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2005
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